by

I have to keep myself in check against the desire to focus on the result of “having read” rather than the process reading. It feels good to get to the end of a book and know that you’ve gained some value from it, but by focusing on the end result, it actually harms the end result. Let me give you an example.

Yesterday, I was reading through the Bullet Journal Method again (I wanted to read something different and this fit). I came to a section with a useful exercise, writing what’s on your mind. “Almost” like GTD where you should get everything out of your head. Now I could have read this and carried on reading but instead I stopped and did the activity.

Now that’s an activity, but there are other reasons to stop. As I read Atomic Habits, I frequently stopped and questioned “How could I apply this to my life?”

I want to make sure that when I read, I do not just go into a trance but take in the information. That reading leads to learning and inspiration not filling time.

I try to focus on the process of reading so that I can benefit the most from each book.

But it feels good to finish a book.

Write a Comment

Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.